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Pixar’s 22 Rules of Storytelling as Image Macros

This is an excellent list of writing rules. Perfect for a writer of any kind.

TwistedSifter

 

Back in 2011, then Pixar storyboard artist Emma Coats (now freelancing) tweeted 22 rules of storytelling, according to Pixar. Coats learned the ‘guidelines’ from senior colleagues on how to create appealing stories, tweeting the nuggets of wisdom over a 6 week period.

Last week, artist and User Experience Director at Visceral Games (a subsidiary of Electronic Arts), Dino Ignacio, created a series of image macros of the 22 rules and posted them to Imgur and Reddit.

Below you will find the list of image macros along with a text summary of Pixar’s 22 rules of storytelling at the end of the post. Enjoy!

[Sources: Emma Coats, Dino Ignacio, The Pixar Touch]

 

1.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (2)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

2.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (3)

Written by Emma Coats | @lawnrocket
Image Macro by Dino Ignacio | @DinoIgnacio

 

3.

pixar's 22 rules of storytelling as image macros (4)

Written…

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Rule #1: Cats are assholes.

I came home early this evening to watch Supernatural and drink wine.

Supernatural, cat, and wine=the perfect evening

Pictured: My planned evening.

Yes, I drink wine out of my TARDIS mug. Anyway, when I got back, one of my cats was missing. Not the one in the above picture: My other roommate found her roaming and stuck her back in my bedroom while I was gone. No, this one was my oldest, my most difficult cat: Milla.

Red cushion

Pictured: Not Milla

Milla normally sleeps under the covers, under the bed, or on one of the red cushions I keep on my feet to keep my toes warm. Only instead of being in any of those perfectly good places, she was upstairs, in one of the two bedrooms that are always open.

My cats never roam the house. Correction: They roamed the house when my roommates were gone for winter break, but now that my roommates are back, it’s not good to let them roam.

Now, it doesn’t seem very polite to search your roommate’s bedroom. Neither does it seem polite to let your cat nest in your roommate’s bedroom. So I went to my first-floor roommate – they all know one another pretty well – and she volunteered to help me find Milla.

And we did. In the boxspring of the only other housemate who has a cat. A cat who doesn’t like other cats.

And my cat, my Milla…trying to get her to do anything is like pulling teeth.

Bloody sink and TARDIS mug

Pictured: My actual evening.

I knew I should have left her alone. She would come down eventually, the way she did before my roommates returned. But now my first-floor roommate was involved, and the two of us ended up in second-floor roommate’s room, sprawled on the floor, trying to wrench a cat from a boxspring.

Pictured: Cat Haven from Hell

I didn’t take pictures because it seemed unseemly to take photos of your roommate’s bedroom. On a side note: I have no connection with my roommates, we speak very rarely, and we have nothing in common, but tonight I rolled around on the floor with first-floor roommate while wearing nothing but a tank, a robe, and last night’s pajama bottoms. On a more positive side note: Milla finally returned, after I cursed her for hissing and (possibly) for breaking second-floor roommate’s wine glass, and each of my five roommates is so friendly and “chill” that she doesn’t mind the rest of us wallowing in their bedroom floor. She doesn’t even mind the broken wine glass. I’m not very social and it’s impossible for me to hold a conversation with these girls unless I’m drunk or talking about cats (the only thing I have in common with any one of them), so I call that a win.

33 Of The Most Hilariously Terrible First Sentences In Literature History

A fun exercise – see what story you can come up with using these first lines.

Thought Catalog

Every year, the announcement of Bulwer-Lytton Prize is a gift from bad writing heaven. Inspired by novelist and playwright Edward George Bulwer-Lytton’s famous “it was a dark and stormy night” opener, the contest asks writers to submit an opening sentence for the “worst of all possible novels” — although Fifty Shades of Grey has already been written. The results are perennially astounding, with entries in every genre from Children’s Literature to Spy Novels, and one sentence awarded the dubious honor of the worst sentence of the year. It’s like the Razzies, but better.

Here are some of the best entries from the past decade of the contest, each of them just as wonderfully atrocious as the next. Think you can write a sentence that’s worse? Leave your (unofficial) submission in the comments.

1. Sue Fondrie

Cheryl’s mind turned like the vanes of a wind-powered turbine, chopping her sparrow-like thoughts into…

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